Bible

Ruth: God’s Providence

So she set out and went and gleaned in the field after the reapers, and she happened to come to the part of the field belonging to Boaz, who was of the clan of Elimelech. (Ruth 2:3 ESV)

And her mother-in-law said to her, “Where did you glean today? And where have you worked? Blessed be the man who took notice of you.” So she told her mother-in-law with whom she had worked and said, “The man’s name with whom I worked today is Boaz.” And Naomi said to her daughter-in-law, “May he be blessed by the LORD, whose kindness has not forsaken the living or the dead!” Naomi also said to her, “The man is a close relative of ours, one of our redeemers.” (Ruth 2:19-20 ESV)

The writer of Ruth sets the scene in Ruth 2:3 of a very coincidental experience for Ruth. By happenstance she came to the part of the field that just happened to belong to Boaz, who just happened to be of the clan of Elimelech, who happened to be her father-in-law. So just a few coincidences strung together. The writer leaves it as this and allows us to create our own conclusions of the events in Ruth 2.

What we see is God’s providence, his control over everything and how everything works together as he would have it. God placed Ruth in that field, it wasn’t by happenstance that she was in the field belonging to Boaz. God had plans for Ruth and for Boaz and it started by placing her into Boaz’s field. Often times we don’t see God’s plan and we most definitely don’t understand it but we can trust that He knows what He is doing. Imagine being in Ruth’s shoes; you marry a guy with a cool name, his dad dies, then he dies and his brother dies. So it’s you, your sister-in-law and your mother-in-law. Your mother-in-law is heading back to her hometown, and she has told you about her God and you have adopted her God as your God; but she tells you to go back to your family, back to your gods, back to your comfort zone, back to a place where you will be well taken care of. If you follow Naomi you’ll be broke, have nothing and have to work to get by, plus you will have to take care of your mother-in-law. Recall Luke 14 when it talks about counting the cost; you have to imagine Ruth thought about these things. She gave up a lot to follow Naomi and her God.

So Ruth puts her head down and gets to work in the field to provide for her mother-in-law and herself; but God has a bigger better plan for her. He places her in one of the fields of Boaz, who just happened to be one of their redeemers. God has control over everything and he has plans for his people, even Ruth the Moabite.

The Word by The Dispatch

It is based off the idea of John 1:1, Jesus being the living Word and everything being created in and through him.

I’ve really been enjoying this song as of late. Really simple but good stuff.

Light came in the world where once the darkness reigned 
Light that shines for all, in Him all things were made 
We are given life through Jesus righteous name 

By the darkened world the Light was not received 
But to everyone who in his name believes 
Jesus gives the right to be a child of God 

Jesus, all things were made 
In Jesus, the light of men 
Is Jesus, our life is found in Him 

We have seen His glory, through the Son of Man 
He came as flesh and blood, so we could understand 
Full of grace and truth, His glory has no end 

Christ the Word, you came to save us 
Light of life, we sing your praises 
God of grace, your mighty name is

									

Come All You Weary: a look at Matthew 11:28

So it's been 2 months + 2 days since I last posted. Life is busy, but that is no excuse, it's not like that really ever changes.

If you were at Applewood last night this was my sermon but most of you weren’t. I sometimes find it difficult to come up with a new idea for a sermon but I had been enjoying this song by Thrice (Also Dustin Kensrue is the man).

Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest

-Matthew 11:28

Here are a few highlights:

Labour and are heavy laden

When Jesus calls those who labour to come to him, he is calling those who have become weary from trying to become right with God on their own. The immediate context is those who were trying to uphold the law to make them right with God but that becomes very tiring very quickly, because our nature is one that is constantly turning away from God. For those who try to obtain salvation on their own, they will become weary because they will constantly be trying to achieve something that isn’t possible.

I have never personally heard anyone use this phrase that they are ‘heavy laden.’ I didn’t really know what it meant too well before looking it up. It means to be heavily burdened. The realization of sin causes heavy burdens. Realizing that you are responsible for your sins before an almighty God who cannot have sin in his presence is a weighty thing. C.H. Spurgeon says that “a soul which has to bear the load of its own sin, and the load of divine wrath, is indeed heavily laden.

An interesting aspect of this is the use of a active verb and a passive verb. Labour is active meaning you are doing something and are heavily laden is passive meaning that this is something that has happened to you. Those who actively try to work for their salvation and those who realize the heavy burden that lies upon them are both called by Jesus to come to him.

Come to me

This invitation is to come to Jesus, not just know about him but to establish a personal relationship. Only those who have acknowledged that they are weary, because they can’t do anything themselves to gain eternal life, and heavy laden, because they carry a tremendous burden, are able to be saved. If you don’t realize these things, you probably won’t see a need to be saved.

I will give you rest

The verb here ‘will‘ is indicative. This is a factual statement, it doesn’t provide room for any doubt. It doesn’t say maybe or could give you rest. This rest is a gift, not that we deserve it but that we receive it from placing trust in Jesus. This rest is that Jesus has done everything already. On the cross he declared “it is finished” and he meant it. There was nothing left for us to do but to trust that Jesus paying for sin was adequate and God doesn’t not require anything further, just trust in what has been done. This is eternal rest, there is a freedom from becoming weary and freedom from the burden of sin.

The gospel doesn’t end here. The lives of those who are saved are changed and these next few verses give guidance in that, but I’m not going to discuss them.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

-Matthew 11:29-30

Ruth: Naomi is a Prodigal

So the two of them went on until they came to Bethlehem. And when they came to Bethlehem, the whole town was stirred because of them. And the women said, “Is this Naomi?” She said to them, “Do not call me Naomi; call me Mara, for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me. I went away full, and the Lord has brought me back empty. Why call me Naomi, when the Lord has testified against me and the Almighty has brought calamity upon me?”

So Naomi returned, and Ruth the Moabite her daughter-in-law with her, who returned from the country of Moab. And they came to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest. (Ruth 1:19-22, ESV)

Up to now we have seen a famine come into Bethlehem which cased Elimelech to move his family from Bethlehem to Moab. They must’ve though this was a great move because then they wouldn’t die. But then all the men in the family do die. They made their life there and now there is only Naomi left from the immediate family. 

Naomi decides to return and when she does she is greeted by those that knew her in Bethlehem. Upon her return she tells them not to call her Naomi, but to call her Mara, which meant bitter. Remember, Naomi meant pleasant, and now she is wanting to be called bitter. But is she ever referred to as Mara? She is never called Mara in the whole book. She was accepted back.

Naomi and the Prodigal

  • She goes out from her home in search for something better because Bethlehem just wasn’t suiting their needs. Just as the prodigal son had enough of being in his father’s house so he took what he had and left.
  • She arrives in Moab and everything seems great at first, but what is she left with? The prodigal son left his father’s house and everything seemed great, he had all this money and was having all this fun, but what is he left with? No friends, no money. He’s found living with the animals.
  • When Naomi realized she had nothing in Moab she decided it was best that she went home. The prodigal son saw what he was living in and decided it was time to go home.
  • Upon their returns both Naomi and the prodigal son both show remorse and say they do not deserve to be reinstated to their previous place. Naomi tells them to call her Mara (“bitter”) and the prodigal son asks to be one of his father’s servants.
  • But both are reinstated. The prodigal son has a party thrown for him and his father embraces him as his son. Naomi is called Naomi and at the end of the book we see those around her celebrating with her, not calling her Mara.

This is always a lesson for us in our relationship with God. We do fail, we all go away from the ‘Father’s house’ but upon return he embraces us, and shows us His great love.

Made Alive!

Ephesians 2:1-10

And you were dead in the trespasses and sins in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience—among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved—and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

Made Alive – Citizens Lyrics

I once was dead in sin alone and hopeless
A child of wrath I walked condemned in darkness
But Your mercy brought new life and in Your love and kindness
Raised me up with Christ and made me righteous

Chorus:
You have bought me back with the riches of
Your amazing grace and relentless love
I’m made alive forever with You, life forever
By Your grace I’m saved, by Your grace I’m saved

Lord, You are the light that broke the darkness
You satisfy my soul when I am heartless
If ever I forget my true identity
Show me who I am and help me to believe

Chorus:
You have bought me back with the riches of
Your amazing grace and relentless love
I’m made alive forever with You, life forever
By Your grace I’m saved, by Your grace I’m saved

My sin has been erased, I’ll never be the same
My sin has been erased, I’ll never be the same

Chorus:
You have bought me back with the riches of
Your amazing grace and relentless love
I’m made alive forever with You, life forever
By Your grace I’m saved, by Your grace I’m saved

Ruth: Her Decision

And she said, “See, your sister-in-law has gone back to her people and to her gods; return after your sister-in-law.” But Ruth said, “Do not urge me to leave you or to return from following you. For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there will I be buried. May the Lord do so to me and more also if anything but death parts me from you.” And when Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more. (Ruth 1:15-18, ESV)

After Naomi’s husband and sons die she decides to return to Bethlehem, her home, with her daughter-in-laws.  But Naomi, realizing the situation,  told her daughter-in-laws not to come back with her because she had nothing to offer them, she had no more sons for them to marry and could not support them either. After they said their goodbyes Orpah left and went back to Moab; but Ruth didn’t. Instead she clung to her. (Ruth 1:14)

Here we see Ruth make a decision. This is her confession of faith. This is her decision to turn from the false gods of Moab and trust in the God of Naomi. Your God, My God”. This statement goes back to the covenant that God made with his people the Israelites: “I will take you to be my people, and I will be your God, and you shall know that I am the Lord your God,” (Exodus 6:7)

Ruth decided to put her faith in God.

Today making a decision is still just as important.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. (John 3:16, ESV)

We are all sinners, which makes us positionally not right with God because God cannot have sin in his presence. Sin has separated us from God. (Isaiah 59:2) This is why God sent his son Jesus Christ to the earth, so that he would pay for sins, the perfect for the imperfect, so that we can be brought to God. (1 Peter 3:18)

Is Jesus Christ your Saviour? Everyone who trusts in Him will be saved. (Romans 10:9; Romans 10:13)

And remember He saves you in 3 ways:

Capture 1

The story of Jesus’ Great⁴³ Grandmother

Ruth is the 8th book of the Bible and through the next few weeks I’m going to work through the the book of Ruth. This will serve as an introduction to provide some background to the story of Ruth.

Ruth is the story of a foreign woman who came out of paganism and idolatry of Moab into the knowledge of the Lord God of Israel and was blessed.

The story of Ruth takes place “in the time of the Judges.” (Ruth 1:1) The story of the Judges “follow a consistent pattern: the people are unfaithful to God and he therefore delivers them into the hands of their enemies; the people repent and entreat God for mercy, which he sends in the form of a leader or champion (a “judge”); the judge delivers the Israelites from oppression and they prosper, but soon they fall again into unfaithfulness and the cycle is repeated.” (Wikipedia)

Ruth is described as a classic love story, a masterpiece of the storyteller’s art and German poet Goethe called it the ‘finest poem in human language. Legend has it that the story of Ruth was read to a group of atheistic, bible bashing, cultured Frenchmen. The names were altered so that it wouldn’t be instantly recognizable. After listening the group of men were delighted by the wonderful literary product and they wanted to know it’s origins. They were in shock when they learned it was from the Bible.

The author of Ruth isn’t known, though Jewish tradition as well as others believe it was Samuel that wrote it. It was written 150-180 years after the events took place. In Ruth 4:7 it talks about “former customs” which distances the events from the writing date. The genealogy that concludes this book ends with David, so it is reasonable to presume that he was the King when the book was written. The exact date isn’t known but it was likely written between 1010BC – 970BC.

We don’t know why it was written but it may have been written for King David. Ruth was David’s great-grandmother. This story was probably very special to David because of the connection with Ruth and the display of God’s grace towards her.

Among others there are 2 main reasons why Ruth is important to us today: The first is the genealogy that is provided. We have a genealogy of Ruth’s legacy that leads to King David and ultimately Jesus Christ. (Seen in Ruth 4:18-22Matthew 1) We also see the connection between the House of David(2 Samuel 7:12-13; Isaiah 9:7) and the Tribe of Judah (Genesis 49:10) (Boaz is from the tribe of Judah) and without Ruth we wouldn’t see this connection. The second reason is that Ruth is an excellent display of redemption and we can learn about redemption through this story. Charles Spurgeon referred to the Lord Jesus Christ as “our glorious Boaz” and we will take a look at that comparison when we get to chapter 4.

So through the next 12 weeks or so I will hope to paint a picture of the story of Ruth and provide some practical aspects as well.